Review: Lu Lin Tea Sunshine Rainbow Blooming Tea

Blooming Tea, Green Tea, Lu Lin Tea, Marigold Tea No Comments »
Alexa’s Teaview Snapshot
Thumbs up!"This tea has a light, sweet, floral flavor. It took about 5-6 minutes for the flower to fully bloom, and it was gorgeous! "
Alexa’s Teaview: 7.8/10
Other Teaviews: Samantha gave it 8/10
Your Reviews:Add your review »

lulinsunshinerainbowSince the sun is shining and the snow is beginning to melt here in Michigan, I decided to open up my Sunshine Rainbow Blooming Tea from Lu Lin. This tea comes in the form of a small green ball. It is green tea from the Fujian Province of China and is said to have floral flavors, which makes sense since it looks like a flower! This little ball of tea didn’t have much of a smell, just a hint of green tea aroma.

I put the tea ball into a clear tea pot full of steaming hot water and watched it like a hawk, not wanting to miss it opening up. I became a little anxious when nothing seemed to happen. After 2 or 3 minutes, like a sun peeking out from behind the clouds, the little ball began to open up, revealing a Globe Amaranth and a Marigold flower. It took about 5-6 minutes for this flower to fully bloom, and it was gorgeous! With the bright yellow and pink colors, it looked like spring-time in my tea pot. The colorful flower is like a lily as it floats atop the light green water. Assuming this tea is ready once the flower is fully bloomed, I poured myself a cup of this Sunshine Rainbow Tea, hoping it would taste as beautiful as it looked.

The tea does have a light, sweet, floral flavor. It also has grassy, vegetal notes. It’s not the type of tea that will amaze you flavor-wise but it is a nice, simple taste that is easy to enjoy. The flowers not only look pretty but have some health benefits. The globe amaranth is beneficial for asthma or coughs and the marigold has detoxifying properties. This tea is also light in caffeine, making it a good afternoon tea.

— To purchase Lu Lin Tea Sunshine Rainbow Blooming Tea, or for more specific information on ingredients or the story behind this particular tea, click here to go directly to the manufacturer's web site.

Teaviews Member: Alexa Alexa
Teaviews.com Reviewer
» Read more about this reviewer on Alexa's profile page.
» Find a list of recent posts by Alexa.

    


Review: Tea Adventure Halfway to the Sky Ban Tian Yao

Oolong Tea, Tea Adventure, Wu Yi Tea No Comments »
Katie’s Teaview Snapshot
Thumbs up!"I much preferred the scent of this tea to the flavour."
Katie’s Teaview: 7.7/10
Other Teaviews: Sophie gave it 7.3/10
Your Reviews:Add your review »

teaadventhalfskyThis rock oolong is from Wuyishan, Fujian, and it has one of the best names I’ve ever heard. The website recommends steeping in either porcelain or clay, so I decide to gong fu the long, twisted leaves in my porcelain gaiwan. One gram leaf (and if you have one, the obsessive compulsive small-interment tea scale really comes in handy here) per ounce 195° water.

My first step is 20 seconds and gives me a brilliant, though mild, scent of oak clay and cream. The flavour is complex, with notes of cream, clay, oak, and fruit. The aftertaste is floral with a strong acidity in the back of the throat. I’m not overtly fond of the cup, but first steeps of oolongs are rarely the best.

Just as I’d hoped, the second steep is better. Again the scent is brilliant, and the flavour is oaky and fruity with an aftertaste of chrysanthemum and clay. One major downside for me is its surprisingly dry finish; I find myself desperately thirsty after drinking the cup.

Following steeps continue in the same vein, and I find that overall I much preferred the scent of this tea to the flavour. It’s a great scent with a good flavour. It’s unique, though, and some people may not dislike the dry finish as much as I did with this tea. Sometimes I want something more aromatic than flavourful, and this is that sort of tea. Not something I’d buy, but worth sampling if you get the chance.

— To purchase Tea Adventure Halfway to the Sky Ban Tian Yao, or for more specific information on ingredients or the story behind this particular tea, click here to go directly to the manufacturer's web site.

Teaviews Member: Katie Katie
Teaviews.com Reviewer
» Read more about this reviewer on Katie's profile page.
» Find a list of recent posts by Katie.

    


Review: Eco-Cha Shan Lin Xi Black Tea

Black Tea, Eco Cha, Oolong Tea No Comments »
Sophie’s Teaview Snapshot
Thumbs up!"As the folks at Eco-cha point out, this tea bridges the gap between black teas and oolongs. Robust cocoa, wood and malt notes back up flowery and fruity tones. A happy accident that deserves to become a classic!"
Sophie’s Teaview: 9.2/10
Your Reviews:Add your review »

ecochashanlinhighThis is a very unusual offering, in that it’s a rolled black tea. It was picked in the winter of 2012 at an elevation of 1500 meters. While not organic, this farm uses only a small amount of pesticides early in the season, eschewing weed killers and chemical fertilizers. Initially intended as an oolong, the leaves were accidentally forgotten and left to oxidize overnight, about to the level of a black tea. Luckily, being a celebrated tea master, the producer managed to salvage the batch and transform it into a unique and delectable brew. Looking at my sample, the rust and chocolate coloured leaf nuggets come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Their aroma is rather faint, mixing raisin and tobacco notes.

I brew this tea gong-fu style, infusing 3 grams of leaf in 150ml of water, heated to 95 degrees Celsius for 25 seconds. The results are a coppery gold cup, bearing an intriguing spearmint and fennel scent. Taking a sip, the taste is very light and refreshing but yet complex. Cocoa, caramel, spearmint and fennel notes all compete for attention in the foreground. The finish is even more spectacular, with its intense and long lasting rose and lychee flavours. The overall effect is surprising but delicious and addictive.

After 30 seconds, my second cup is now closer to what would expect from a traditional black tea. It’s still very sweet with hints of cinnamon, peaches, malt and toasted bread. Its fruitiness reminds me of second flush Darjeelings.

I manage to pull 5 more steeps from the leaves, adding 5 seconds at a time to the first 3, and then 10 seconds each to the next 2. All are very similar to each other. Simple yet satisfying, these combine apricot, fennel, green bean and cantaloupe, getting progressively grassier.

My final steep clocked in at 1 minute 30. The tea is still smooth and vaguely sweet. It’s fairly watery though. I would recommend a longer brew time for a more palatable cup.

As the folks at Eco-cha point out, this tea bridges the gap between black teas and oolongs. Robust cocoa, wood and malt notes back up flowery and fruity tones. It’s important to note that this offering is only available through this vendor, as they bought the entire batch. A happy accident that deserves to become a classic!

— To purchase Eco-Cha Shan Lin Xi Black Tea, or for more specific information on ingredients or the story behind this particular tea, click here to go directly to the manufacturer's web site.

Teaviews Member: Sophie Sophie
Teaviews.com Reviewer
» Read more about this reviewer on Sophie's profile page.
» Find a list of recent posts by Sophie.

    


Review: Canton Tea Co. Organic Arya Emerald Darjeeling

Canton Tea Co., Darjeeling Tea, Green Tea No Comments »
Katie’s Teaview Snapshot
Thumbs up!"Beautiful grapiness and a hint of caramel."
Katie’s Teaview: 8.1/10
Other Teaviews: Sophie gave it 8.8/10
Your Reviews:Add your review »

cantonemeralddarjeelingAccording to Canton Tea’s website, Arya estate teas are exclusive to this company in the UK. Additionally, I’ve only ever had Arya’s deliciously malty black teas before, so getting to try this green 2013 second flush leaf is quite the treat.

The leaves are distinctly Darjeeling, curled copper and brown that smell like hay and grapes. I steep according to the website, at 160° for two minutes. On my first attempt, I use my usual tap water, but I find the taste overly mineral for a Darjeeling, a flavour I don’t mind but suspect is covering up the subtleties of this tea, so I decide to try filtered water.

After brewing new leaves with filtered H2O, the cup smells fruity, like muscatel, with overtones of an interesting puerh-like earthiness. As I’d hoped, the mineral is gone, replaced with a beautiful grapiness and a hint of caramel. There’s a vegetal bitterness balanced by a mild sweetness, and an earthiness arcs over the whole cup. Given the robust and unique flavour profile of the Arya Ruby black teas I’ve tried, I’m not surprised that this lighter blend still manages to stand out with a distinct rich earthiness.

The mineral flavour returns for the second steep, which is also unfortunately bitter. It’s an okay follow up steep, but nothing special whereas the first was something special. Overall, though, I’m just not sure in the end if it’s something I’d buy. I enjoyed the other Arya and Canton teas I’ve had more, so while it’s good, it’s not at the top of my list. I’m glad I got the chance to sample it though, and if you are able, I recommend you try it.

— To purchase Canton Tea Co. Organic Arya Emerald Darjeeling, or for more specific information on ingredients or the story behind this particular tea, click here to go directly to the manufacturer's web site.

Teaviews Member: Katie Katie
Teaviews.com Reviewer
» Read more about this reviewer on Katie's profile page.
» Find a list of recent posts by Katie.

    

Review: Eco-Cha Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Black Tea

Black Tea, Eco Cha No Comments »

ecochashanlinhighSince this was my first time trying Eco-Cha tea, I decided to look up their website and do some research. I found that Eco-Cha was created to provide the world with high quality tea from Taiwan. They aim to share Taiwan culture with the world. Taiwan is most famous for its high quality Oolong and Black Tea. The pictures on their site are beautiful and really showcase their natural looking tea leaves.

While reading about this High Mountain Black Tea, I discovered that it is a result of an accident or oversight. These leaves were grown at an elevation of 1500m and hand picked. They were then accidentally left to oxidize longer than the other tea leaves. They became oxidized to the point of red (black) teas. Due to the high oxidization, this tea is like a “red oolong”, as they put it.
I steeped 1 1/2 teaspoons of this Shan Lin Xi Black Tea in 2 cups of water. The water turned a light brown color. The leaves, which were crumpled into tiny balls, began to unravel and reveal greenish brown leaves. As I smelled this tea, I could tell it was going to be a full bodied brew packed with flavor. After steeping for 3 minutes, I took a sip. This tea is extraordinary! There are so many different flavors packed into one tea. When smelling the dried leaves, I detected a very floral, rose-like aroma. This tea also has a rose-like flavor. It is very sweet for a black tea! I was very surprised at the sweetness. It is rich and smooth as well. It tastes spicy like cinnamon and sweet like vanilla. It has a savory, woody after-taste. I absolutely loved this tea.

On top of having a remarkable flavor, Eco-Cha’s website assured me that this tea is grown without any chemical weed killers or fertilizers. I’m extra careful about drinking tea that could possibly have pesticides on it. Since it contains caffeine, it is a good morning tea. If you enjoy the purity of an oolong and the richness of a black tea, then you’ll love this brew. It’s the best of both worlds.

— To purchase Eco-Cha Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Black Tea, or for more specific information on ingredients or the story behind this particular tea, click here to go directly to the manufacturer's web site.

Teaviews Member: Alexa Alexa
Teaviews.com Reviewer
» Read more about this reviewer on Alexa's profile page.
» Find a list of recent posts by Alexa.

    

Review: Teavivre Da Hong Pao

Oolong Tea, Teavivre No Comments »
Samantha’s Teaview Snapshot
Thumbs up!"The overall quality is definitely mineral like with a thinner body than a black tea would give. The taste very quickly reminds me of grapes, the aftertaste is sweet and pleasing. If you're looking to try Wuyi rock teas, Da Hong Pao is a very logical first choice. "
Samantha’s Teaview: 8.2/10
Other Teaviews: Sophie gave it 7.2/10, Raven gave it 7.8/10, Christopher gave it 4/10
Your Reviews: 1/10
1 reader review | Add your review »

Teavivre’s Da Hong Pao was grown and produces in Wuyi, Fujian. Wuyi teas are known for their mineral like quality and deep rich flavor. They are called rock teas because they grow on high rocky mountains. This particular offering was harvested in May of 2013. The leaves are dark in color and have one or two bud covered leaves. The liquor appears dark orange and smells sweet and roasted. A series of short brews are just as appropriate as one long brew with this cup. Multiple short brews will yield mellower flavors while a long brew will bring out the richness of the leaves.

A tablespoon of leaves were used and brewed at 190F for 3 minutes. The resulting aroma is very sweet smelling, and amber in color. The overall quality is definitely mineral like with a thinner body than a black tea would give. The taste very quickly reminds me of grapes, the aftertaste is sweet and pleasing. If you’re looking to try Wuyi rock teas, Da Hong Pao is a very logical first choice. The price is a bit steep for this tea, $16.90 for 3.5 ounces, but if you’re into rock teas, then you’d pay this.

— To purchase Teavivre Da Hong Pao, or for more specific information on ingredients or the story behind this particular tea, click here to go directly to the manufacturer's web site.

Teaviews Member: Samantha Samantha
Teaviews.com Reviewer
» Read more about this reviewer on Samantha's profile page.
» Find a list of recent posts by Samantha.

    

WP Theme & Icons by N.Design Studio
Entries RSS Comments RSS Log in