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  #31  
Old 04-10-2012, 09:55 AM
Lissa Lissa is offline
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Thumbs up DragonWell is my favorite green Tea

DragonWell is my favorite green Tea.

Like most other Chinese green tea, Longjing tea leaves are roasted early in processing (after picking) to stop the natural "fermentation" process, which is a part of creating black and oolong teas. In the world of tea, the term "fermentation" refers to the actions of natural enzymes, present in the leaves, on the juices and tissues of the leaf; this is not "fermentation" in the true sense of the term (as, for example, the action of yeast in producing beer). The actions of these enzymes is stopped by 'firing' (heating in pans) or by steaming the leaves before they completely dry out. As is the case with other green teas (and 'white teas'), Longjing tea leaves are therefore "unfermented." When steeped, the tea produces a yellow-green color, a gentle, pure aroma, and a rich flavor. The tea contains Vitamin C, amino acids, and, like most finer Chinese green teas, has one of the highest concentrations of catechins among teas.
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  #32  
Old 04-12-2012, 09:32 AM
TeaVivre TeaVivre is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Fujian, China
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DragonWell is my favorite green Tea.

Like most other Chinese green tea, Longjing tea leaves are roasted early in processing (after picking) to stop the natural "fermentation" process, which is a part of creating black and oolong teas. In the world of tea, the term "fermentation" refers to the actions of natural enzymes, present in the leaves, on the juices and tissues of the leaf; this is not "fermentation" in the true sense of the term (as, for example, the action of yeast in producing beer). The actions of these enzymes is stopped by 'firing' (heating in pans) or by steaming the leaves before they completely dry out. As is the case with other green teas (and 'white teas'), Longjing tea leaves are therefore "unfermented." When steeped, the tea produces a yellow-green color, a gentle, pure aroma, and a rich flavor. The tea contains Vitamin C, amino acids, and, like most finer Chinese green teas, has one of the highest concentrations of catechins among teas.

Dragon Well is a very tasty and delicious green tea, also belongs to one of Chinese top ten teas! It has a long, distinguished, history of over 1,200 years. During the Ming Dynasty, it became very popular and was listed as one of the top grade teas in China. And it was famously presented to Richard Nixon when he visited China in the 60's.

Except this excellent green teas, other green tea are also very delicious, such as Bi Luo Chun, Tai Mu Mao Jian, etc.
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  #33  
Old 04-28-2012, 11:48 AM
Blwderkik Blwderkik is offline
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Originally Posted by TeaVivre View Post
Dragon Well is a very tasty and delicious green tea, also belongs to one of Chinese top ten teas! It has a long, distinguished, history of over 1,200 years. During the Ming Dynasty, it became very popular and was listed as one of the top grade teas in China. And it was famously presented to Richard Nixon when he visited China in the 60's.

Except this excellent green teas, other green tea are also very delicious, such as Bi Luo Chun, Tai Mu Mao Jian, etc.
Yeah,you are right.I like Xihu Longjing very much!
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