Review: KTeas Formosa Fancy Superior Taifu

KTeas, Oolong Tea Add comments
Geoff’s Teaview Snapshot
Thumbs up!"It reminded me of a Bai Mu Dan white or a lotus-scented Vietnamese green, or perhaps a blend of the both. If I was trying this blind, oolong would not be my first guess."
Geoff’s Teaview: 7.2/10
Other Teaviews: Shaiha gave it 8.6/10, Brad gave it 7.5/10, Dan gave it 8.0/10, Katie gave it 7.4/10
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kteaslogoI have very little knowledge of Formosan - or rather, Taiwanese - teas. On a random tea shop stop, I think I tried a Taiwanese milk oolong knock-off and another green tea. Neither made a significant impression. Oolongs from the region were unexplored territory for me. KTeas mentions in their notes that Taiwanese oolongs are known as "Five Color Tea". I can see why. The dry batch looked like a blend of first flush orange pekoe, white peony, and maybe a Longjing green for good measure. In appearance, it seemed like a blend.

The dry batch scent left very little impact. They smelled like leaves. Nuance escaped me. If I tried, I could pick up an earthy, soil-like aroma, but that's reaching. That seems to be a running gag in the most recent oolongs I've taste-tested. None had a smell that prepared me for the taste. I think the tea gods are playing a practical joke.

KTeas brewing instructions always dumbfound me. Not for their lack of accuracy, but rather how odd they seem on first glance. Nine times outta ten, though, they're spot on. The ones for this oolong were no less odd; 2 heaping teaspoons per 8oz of boiling water for four minutes. I didn't have access to boiling water, so I had to brew it at a 190F, which I've always been told was standard for oolongs.

Even at the gentle temperature I set it at, the liquor brewed to a deep gold-brown. The aroma was crisp and forest fresh with a bit of a malty kick at the end. Taste-wise, I would have to say it lacked the usual wallop of other oolongs. It reminded me of a Bai Mu Dan white or a lotus-scented Vietnamese green, or perhaps a blend of the both. If I was trying this blind, oolong would not be my first guess. That isn't necessarily a bad thing. Oolongs that were too...well..."oolong"-y left me wanting. This was refreshing enough, but lacking some of the subtleties of some of its stronger kin. Oolong in name only...but what's in a name anyway?

— To purchase KTeas Formosa Fancy Superior Taifu, or for more specific information on ingredients or the story behind this particular tea, click here to go directly to the manufacturer's web site.

Teaviews Member: Geoff Geoff
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