Review: Grand Tea Xi Hu Dragon Well

Dragonwell Tea, Grand Tea, Green Tea, Longjing Tea Add comments
Geoff’s Teaview Snapshot
Thumbs up!"It wasn't a vegetal aroma in the spinach sense, but more along the lines of a summertime leaf prior to its autumnal fall. Such a scent is usually pungent but balanced; as was the case here."
Geoff’s Teaview: 8.2/10
Other Teaviews: Lynn gave it 8.5/10, Raven gave it 8.4/10, Bryan gave it 5.1/10
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I remember the first time I tried a Dragon Well green tea, but not because it was a pleasant experience. I received a 1oz sample from a company I purchased some yellow tea from. I was elated to receive it. That is, until I tasted it. Awful, simply awful. All spinach, no tea. However, sometime later down the line I tried a Longjing. I assumed I liked it better than a Dragon Well. Little did I know, they were one in the same, which convinced me that I may have had a bad batch.

Grand Tea presents a Dragon Well with the pretext of "Xi Hu". The moniker could denote the name of a fresh water lake in Zhejiang Province - the same location where Dragon Well is cultivated. The region has an incredibly rich history, one I couldn't even begin to summarize here. I can mention, though, that the original name for the lake was "Wulin", which just so happens to be the backdrop for a "battle-puppet" TV series in Taiwan. The American name for the series was "Wulin Warriors". I have no idea if the two are connected.

But on to the tea.

This Dragon Well possessed a scent that was floral, sweet, and a dash of something in between citrus and cinnamon. A very pleasant aroma, to be sure. The leaves themselves were a presentable light green, and flat in appearance like a Chinese-derived sencha. I likened them to bark shavings from a very young tree. Couldn't wait to steep 'em.

Brewing instructions called for 75-80C water. I went with 1 level teaspoon in 8oz of water for three minutes at the bare minimum temp to start. Since this was described as a roasted green, lighter seemed better.

The cup infused to a clear-to-green liquor with a subtly grassy nose. It wasn't a vegetal aroma in the spinach sense, but more along the lines of a summertime leaf prior to its autumnal fall. Such a scent is usually pungent but balanced; as was the case here. The taste had the same traits listed above, but with a welcomed buttery note - creamy on the foretaste, floral in the middle. It isn't quite up to the feathery excellence of the Bi Lo Chun also put out by Grand Tea, but it's still worth a look and taste.

— To purchase Grand Tea Xi Hu Dragon Well, or for more specific information on ingredients or the story behind this particular tea, click here to go directly to the manufacturer's web site.

Teaviews Member: Geoff Geoff
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