Review: BOH Tea Palas Supreme

Black Tea, BOH Tea Add comments
Sophie’s Teaview Snapshot
Thumbs up!"While I'm sure it could stand up to milk or sugar or both, it doesn't require any additions to feel smooth and satisfying. A subtle, underlying malty sweetness helps balance things out. All in all I found these leaves made for a simple yet fulfilling and refreshing cuppa."
Sophie’s Teaview: 8.5/10
Other Teaviews: Dan gave it 7.8/10, MaryAnn gave it 6/10, Katie gave it 7.7/10, Vanessa gave it 8/10, CJ gave it 7/10
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I have been eager to try out some of this tea for some time, more for nostalgia's sake than anything else. Fifteen years ago, I travelled through Malaysia's Cameron Highlands, where this tea is grown. In stark contrast to the hot and arid coastal areas of the country, the hilly interior is cool and misty. In other words, it's perfect tea growing country. The lush green terraces of the tea plantations are quite stunning and well worth a visit. Many pictures are included on BOH's website for those who want to take a look.

In Malaysia BOH is the equivalent of Lipton or Red Rose, so I'm not expecting anything too spectacular from of these leaves. Unfortunately BOH's website is difficult to navigate and not at all user friendly. Even if you do finally find what you're looking for, they provide little information on their teas. This black tea is labelled as a “fine, flowery pekoe”. The leaves are a rich shade of chocolate brown. They present a variety of shapes and sizes, most being thin and broken. Their aroma is a faint mixture of hickory smoke, raisins and malt.

Since there were no brewing instructions available, I steeped these leaves like any standard black tea, infusing a teaspoonful of leaves in freshly boiled water for 3 minutes. The resulting brew is a rather sturdy-looking coppery brown cup. It's aroma is faint, alternately lightly malty, tannic and astringent. Taking a sip, I'm surprised at the lightness of the flavour profile. There are some dry tannins present, as the aroma foreshadowed, as well as an almost lemony tang to the finish, but these are not overpowering. While I'm sure it could stand up to milk or sugar or both, it doesn't require any additions to feel smooth and satisfying. A subtle, underlying malty sweetness helps balance things out. All in all I found these leaves made for a simple yet fulfilling and refreshing cuppa.

I tried a second steep, infusing the leaves again for 4 minutes. The cup makes for an enjoyable although somewhat plain black tea: much of the subtleties that made the initial infusion special have now faded. There is also a slightly bitter edge to the finish. While the malt and raisin top notes keep it in check, it doesn't really add anything worthwhile to the flavour profile.

I'm not sure I would reach for this tea if I wanted something intensely strong as a morning brew. This delicate tea is better suited for a less caffeinated mid-morning break - second breakfast anyone? I expect that it's well-rounded, sweet yet refreshingly astringent profile will be perfect for warmer weather sipping. Other pluses also include BOH's pretty butterfly adorned packaging and reasonable price.

— To purchase BOH Tea Palas Supreme, or for more specific information on ingredients or the story behind this particular tea, click here to go directly to the manufacturer's web site.

Teaviews Member: Sophie Sophie
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