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  #21  
Old 11-24-2009, 05:10 AM
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With all the twits searching for magical cancer cures that haven't panned out, you'd think there would be some nutritional Biochemist studying these things for us.. where are the papers on the processing and chemical composition of Milk Oolong, and Puerh, and everything else? Damn lazy scientists, always "i'm curing cancer"... bah.
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  #22  
Old 11-24-2009, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Lynn View Post
The temperature aspect of milk oolong sounds plausible to me. It's very similar to how ice wine occurs. Used to live in w. NY wine country.
But see therein is the problem. It reliably freezes in regions known for their ice wine, its not a variable, its a fact that the grapes will freeze if you just leave them out past the first frost. But the story which is (hate to use the word yet again) parroted is that the "real" milk Oolong is the product of a seasonal temperature drop, which to me sounds like they have to catch the leaves somewhere between their reaction to the first frost, and them actually suffering frost damage.

If its just "ice tea" and somehow the product of frost damaged leaves that would make some sense, but a drop as in the stories doesn't seem likely to produce as large, or as reliable of a harvest as would be needed to supply whats seen on the market, and as near as I can tell "Milk Oolong" is not a seasonal product, at least no more so than any other tea.

I know some Oolongs can have a creamy or buttery quality perfectly naturally, I've experienced that, and I know that Jin Xuan has a strong creamy "milk" flavor, because I've had it, and because it was bred for that in Taiwan and thats the whole point of it, so it doesn't seem likely that the milky flavor is a product of the plant protecting itself from frost since Jin Xuan tastes creamy/milky without the slightest touch of frost.

But again, if anyone out there has first hand experience in the industry, and knows the chemistry/biology behind how normal (non milky) Oolongs can develop a creamy milk flavor naturally due to a seasonal climate change, I'm all ears... Which admittedly is pretty goofy looking, being all ears and whatnot.
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  #23  
Old 12-24-2009, 07:34 PM
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Default ATR Milk Oolong

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But see therein is the problem. It reliably freezes in regions known for their ice wine, its not a variable, its a fact that the grapes will freeze if you just leave them out past the first frost. But the story which is (hate to use the word yet again) parroted is that the "real" milk Oolong is the product of a seasonal temperature drop, which to me sounds like they have to catch the leaves somewhere between their reaction to the first frost, and them actually suffering frost damage. .

I don't mean this to be a promotion or anything, but last night two teaspoons of ATR's Milk Oolong in a small Yixing pot yielded nearly 3 liters of very good, creamy tea over the course of the evening. Short, gong fu steepings. And that's not an exaggeration; we nearly drained my 3 liter hot water pot. For me, that puts to rest the idea of any artificial flavoring for this particular MO, since that would have washed away far sooner. The leaves are huge and edged with red, like a good TQY, of which they are a subclass, I think. Pretty darn impressive! Review upcoming.
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  #24  
Old 12-24-2009, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Lynn View Post
I don't mean this to be a promotion or anything, but last night two teaspoons of ATR's Milk Oolong in a small Yixing pot yielded nearly 3 liters of very good, creamy tea over the course of the evening. Short, gong fu steepings. And that's not an exaggeration; we nearly drained my 3 liter hot water pot. For me, that puts to rest the idea of any artificial flavoring for this particular MO, since that would have washed away far sooner. The leaves are huge and edged with red, like a good TQY, of which they are a subclass, I think. Pretty darn impressive! Review upcoming.
Well I said its origin story is questionable, I didn't say it wasn't awesome. I love milk Oolong.
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  #25  
Old 12-31-2009, 10:37 PM
AlexZorach AlexZorach is offline
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I ran into this same question and it seemed a bit of a mystery at first, with conflicting stories about what milk oolong is...a natural variety, a steaming process with milk, or artificial flavoring??? I think I sorted it out pretty clearly in my article on milk oolong...the conclusion is that all three methods are probably used.

Let me know if you know of any reputable sources that you think would improve the references on that page. I reference Ten Ren because it's the largest company that has an example of the "steaming" method, and Tony Gebely's post on World of Tea, Unraveling the Mystery of Milk Oolong a bit more: Admari Teas, because it seemed to offer the most balanced and critical perspective that I could find.

Last edited by AlexZorach : 12-22-2011 at 10:09 PM.
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  #26  
Old 01-02-2010, 05:51 AM
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It doesn't really sort it out....

I mean its coming from someone who's selling milk oolong, it again doesn't really specify what this magical "Temperature drop" is, what regions, ruffly how many degrees, what part of the year. And as always the gist is "Everyone else uses flavoring, but ours is the real deal"..

I know, for certain, that there are a few totally natural milky flavored oolongs, but these dont seem to have anything to do with vauge seasonal weather changes, they are always milky (Jin Xuan and Qingxin Wulong for instance) and there are some who are clearly artificially flavored.

I guess thats really all there is to it, I suppose what is really irritating is that the tea factories won't just admit that, that there is no "Magic hour" that turns normal tea fields into milk oolong fields, that its the varietal or that its flavored as the case may be.
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Old 02-20-2011, 10:24 PM
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I found it interested that this vendor comes right out and indicates that one of the oolong in it's Milk Oolong Sampler is flavored. I also found this deal, which includes free shipping, too good to pass up.

http://www.teafromtaiwan.com/shop/tea-samples/jin-xuan
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  #28  
Old 02-20-2011, 11:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Laura View Post
I found it interested that this vendor comes right out and indicates that one of the oolong in it's Milk Oolong Sampler is flavored. I also found this deal, which includes free shipping, too good to pass up.

http://www.teafromtaiwan.com/shop/tea-samples/jin-xuan
What a great find--and price! I just ordered the sample pack too. It will be interesting to compare them. I want to see if the flavored ones hold up to multiple steepings, as ATR's does.
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  #29  
Old 02-21-2011, 07:00 PM
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Very nice! Thanks for sharing.
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  #30  
Old 04-08-2011, 09:58 PM
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Laura/Lynn,
Did you guys get your oolong samplers? How were they?
If you give it the thumbs up, I might be placing an order as well.
Thanks!
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