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Old 10-26-2008, 01:58 PM
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Laura Laura is offline
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Default Tea Makers & Cleaning

I have a Teavana Perfect Tea Maker---2 of them actually. I have the big one shown on the link below and a little one. In case you are wondering why, it is nice to have two for when you have a tea that will provide multiple infusions---I often don't like to drink 4 cups of the same thing in a row.

Anyway, my tea maker does not come apart to clean it. I have only had it since May and it is starting to look pretty scary. I hate to buy a new one already because there is nothing else wrong with the thing. Does anyone know of a tea maker that you can take apart and clean? Or have you found a way to clean one of these? I really don't want to change how I brew.

http://www.teavana.com/Tea-Products/...Maker-32oz.axd
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Old 10-26-2008, 02:47 PM
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I have the smaller one from Teavana, and I've found the best way to clean is just to run it under hot tap water whenever you change the tea leaves. I usually press the bottom so the water runs through, slosh it around a bit when it's inside, and if I'm feeling really ambitious, I flip it over and run water through it backwards. Every so often I'll fill the sink with hot soapy water, submerge it, and let it soak for a bit, which seems to help. I'm sure mine's beyond of point of ever actually looking perfectly clean again, but it does help with the lingering scent of past teas.

It's not the most convenient way to clean it, but it's the best I've found. I've been meaning to experiment with it, but just haven't had the time lately If anyone else has another way to clean it, I'd love to hear it, too
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Old 10-27-2008, 04:47 PM
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I have a Zarafina tea maker and while it doesn't come apart it doesn't look dirty at all after almost than a year of continual use. The stainless steal inside the chamber is a little stained but it is tea afterall. Linens N' Things may have it on sale since they are going out of business.
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Old 12-16-2009, 11:37 PM
BeastOfTraal BeastOfTraal is offline
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I new to tea but I've been using the teavana perfact tea maker. I just rust rinse it out with warm water when I'm done. a stainless steel lined tea maker would probably be better. aromas of strongly spiced tea are hard to clean from plastics.
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Old 12-17-2009, 01:49 AM
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I have since discovered that the tea makers from Adagio come apart....just fyi.
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Old 12-17-2009, 02:44 AM
American Tea Room American Tea Room is offline
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Not only does plastic impart an artificial taste -- certain plastics contain
suspected carcinogens -- especially when they come into contact with hot liquids -- not the best additive to tea. Stainless is better as is glass. But why not make tea the way its been done for 3000 years in clay? Or for the past 600 years in cast iron? Your tea drinking experience will be so much more enjoyable and flavorful. I am sure Lynn and Katie (amongst others) will vouch for using specific teapots. And just throw away the plastic!
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Old 12-17-2009, 03:33 AM
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Haha, I see someone else has been reading (for lack of a better phrase) our teapot porn thread. For the record (ahem, Troy), I mean that as "lurid or sensational material," not naked ladies with Brown Bettys.

I'm not big on the plastic because, as Dave said, there are theories that it's unsafe. But beyond that, it really detracts from the ceremony of tea making, which I'm coming to appreciate more and more. Even if you just invest in a single glazed clay or cast iron teapot, it's not the most tea snob-ish, but it sure is perty.
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Old 12-17-2009, 05:19 AM
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naked ladies with Brown Bettys = A happy world.

As for plastic, i don't know that I buy it, Food grade plastics are tested specifically for leaching, so the likelyhood that they are imparting anything to the tea is fairly low. That said, for entirely thermal reasons, Clay and glass are groovy, plus they are more fun to play with, better looking, last longer, and won't be mistaken for a measuring cup.
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Old 12-18-2009, 12:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by American Tea Room View Post
Not only does plastic impart an artificial taste -- certain plastics contain
suspected carcinogens -- especially when they come into contact with hot liquids -- not the best additive to tea. Stainless is better as is glass. But why not make tea the way its been done for 3000 years in clay? Or for the past 600 years in cast iron? Your tea drinking experience will be so much more enjoyable and flavorful. I am sure Lynn and Katie (amongst others) will vouch for using specific teapots. And just throw away the plastic!
I don't know if it's snobbery, habit, or distrust, but I just can't imagine brewing tea in anything plastic. But I was taught to drink tea by old Scots Canadian ladies armed with Brown Betties or the like, so I'm deeply imprinted on anything clay, and glass by default. I have a couple of nice Chinese rice china pots I've used for—eek! 3 decades? (how is this possible??) for flavored teas and larger batches of blacks. My recent addiction (knowing you have a problem is the first step) to Yixing has only reinforced my love of natural materials and hand made things.
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Old 12-18-2009, 01:14 AM
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Your yixing addiction isn't your fault, Lynn. Mary at Sensational Teas has a way of making you want to buy dozens of teapots from her.
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